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In Xcode 6 beta 4, Swift adds support for access control. This gives you complete control over what part of the code is accessible within a single file, available across your project, or made public as API for anyone that imports your framework. The three access levels included in this release are:

  • private entities are available only from within the source file where they are defined.
  • internal entities are available to the entire module that includes the definition (e.g. an app or framework target).
  • public entities are intended for use as API, and can be accessed by any file that imports the module, e.g. as a framework used in several of your projects.

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Learn how to make your user interfaces in iOS feel realistic with this UIKit Dynamics tutorial, updated for Swift!

The design goals of iOS encourage you to create digital interfaces that react to touch, gestures, and changes in orientation as if they were physical objects far beyond a simple collection of pixels. The end result gives the user a deeper connection with the interface than is possible through skin-deep skeuomorphism.

This sounds like a daunting task, as it is much easier to make a digital interface look real, than it is to make it feel real. However, you have some nifty new tools on your side: UIKit Dynamics and Motion Effects.

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Here’s a library called FastAnimationWithPOP from William Zang that makes creating animations with Pop easier through attributes so you can create different animations without code in Storyboards (you can also create animations easily using code if desired).

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Learn how to use UIGestureRecognizer with Swift in your iOS apps, as well as how make your own custom gestures.

If you need to detect gestures in your app, such as taps, pinches, pans, or rotations, it’s extremely easy with Swift and the built-in UIGestureRecognizer classes.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how you can easily add gesture recognizers into your app, both within the Storyboard editor in Xcode, and programatically. You’ll create a simple app where you can move a monkey and a banana around by dragging, pinching, and rotating with the help of gesture recognizers.

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One of the issues you’ll notice when using Swift is that native key-value-observing is not available and only works with NSObject subclasses.

Swift is changing rapidly and a solution does appear to be on the roadmap for this issue. Until the solution arrives here’s a tutorial from Krzysztof Zablocki illustrating a nice technique for implementing observable properties completely using Swift. This technique uses generics and what’s really nice is that you can create the observable properties without affecting the rest of your code.

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Although iOS 8 and Swift has garnered the lion’s share of attention of the WWDC 2014 announcements, the additions and improvements to testing in Xcode 6 may end up making some of the most profound impact in the long-term.

This week, we’ll take a look at XCTest, the testing framework built into Xcode, as well as the exciting new additions in Xcode 6: XCTestExpectation and performance tests.

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Here’s a database called built from the ground up for mobile devices and is faster than SQLite with an extensive feature set that eliminates the need for an exteneral ORM framework.

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Here’s an interesting app that has been open sourced by Bartosz called Revolved. Revolved is a 3D modeling app that has a unique interface in which the user draws the 3d models by drawing curves and has the ability to export the models for use in other modeling programs.

Here’s a screenshot from the App Store showing off some models drawn in Revolved:

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